It’s not always about changing the world

March 17, 2010 by  
Filed under Making a Difference

According to Rob Carpenter , CEO of Friendgiftr.com, being a social entrepreneur is about more than solving a global problem.

An article in youngupstarts.com quotes Carpenter:  “It’s not just the fact that you are your own boss, but it’s the notion that you have a profound opportunity to create new jobs, new industries, and re-make society,” says Carpenter. ”There’s nothing better than to introduce innovations that allow people to live better, more convenient lives – whether you’re offering them a product or service or trying to save the world.”

The biggest lesson he’s learnt as an entrepreneur is to be patient and persistent. “If you want to be an entrepreneur, run a company or nonprofit, make bold changes, and do all of the other incredibly difficult and challenging things that entrepreneurs do on a daily basis, you have to have the tenacity to hold on to your hope until one day your time arrives,” he shares. ”If you believe strongly enough in yourself, other people will start to believe in you, too.”

Carpenter advises other young startups to “Dream big, work hard, learn everyday, be true to yourself, and never give in. If you follow some variation of these themes, you will one day get to where you want to be and achieve your wildest dreams.”

If trying to change the world feels like an overwhelming goal for you right now, how can your business or your dreams create new jobs, new industries or impact positive change in your own community? As always, we’d love to hear our comments.

You can  learn more about Rob Carpenter  here: Friendgiftr.com.. For more on how you can start a business that makes a local or global  impact, CLICK HERE

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    Is FEAR behind your drive to change the status quo?

    March 11, 2010 by  
    Filed under Making a Difference

    At a Summit on Social Entrepreneurship at Yale University last week,  “Sandbox” community members were asked to share their thoughts on “Fearless Leadership”. Interestingly, the young change agents argued that if you wish to change the status quo you must fear something.

    Sandbox members identified three fears necessary to drive change:

    1. The fear of not having an impact.
    2. The fear of doing something they are not genuinely passionate about.
    3. The fear of being ‘normal’.

    Had I been asked the same question, I’d have cited discontent or anger at an injustice, but this got me thinking about what is at the core of my own drive to want to make a difference. Does it really stem from my fear of leaving this earth without having made an impact? Is it the fear of not doing something more meaningful. Is it a fear of mediocrity? Maybe. Probably. What about you? What fuels your need to create change? As always, you are invited to share your views here.

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