Crafting A Living

Turn you Craft Into Cash.

Are you an Art Snob or Craft Connoisseur?

I admit it. I was an Art Snob. I didn’t consider crafts an art form. Yes, glass blowing, metal smithing, maybe even pottery, but I turned my nose up at cropping, stamping and needlework. I saw them as “housewife” or ‘granny-crafts”, color-inside-the-lines for those who had no imagination. And collage, well, that was just something for people who couldn’t draw or paint.  That was, until I saw some of the amazingly creative things artists do with fiber, paper and glue. Now, I’m a convert.

My old attitude came from a misguided background in fine art. Actually,  I was a misfit in a competitive Design , Art and Architecture College at a large university.   It was immediately apparent they’d made a mistake accepting me into the art education program. I’m a creative idea generator but to say I’m not a perfectionist is an understatement. Several of our design courses were combined with architecture and industrial design students and, well, let’s just say,  I didn’t fit in.  Another part of the curriculum was classic training in the fine arts of drawing, painting and sculpture. It was unacceptable if not laughable to even consider creating anything functional and the idea of mixed media? Not even concidered art. Today, so many of my favorite artists combine materials to create stunning visual art.

Decades later as I walked the aisles of the Buyer’s Market  of American Craft in Philli or the American Crafts Council Show, I thought, “Why didn’t I know when I was in school that metal work or glass blowing were viable options as an artist? And as I looked around my gallery full of  delighted customers purchasing “functional” art (craft), I visualized the disapproving face of my old college professor and smiled, happy I that I’d followed my heart and opened my mind to the world outside of fine art.

Yes, I’m still in awe of painters and sculptors and I do have fine art hanging in my home. I’m also proud of the funky, fun, functional craft I own. It makes me happy and I know that the crafts people I purchased it from are artists as well.

THE Maker’s Guide To Making More Money Online AND OFF

Beyond Etsy Letter Size

You’ve probably read books on how to start a business and even some on creating a  business selling your art or handmade crafts. There are even some courses out there on starting a crafts business but most are from the perspective of someone who has sold their craft online OR at craft shows OR sold wholesale. None give you first hand advice and stories from artists and crafts people who have experienced ALL areas of the hand made world.

I keep hearing from readers that they want to make a living selling their handmade art and they’ve read books and even sought advise from SBA advisors but that they are more confused than ever because they don’t understand the MBA speak. Creative entrepreneurs think differently and need advise from someone who speaks and understands their language.

I’ve been listening to your questions and challenges, making notes from my decades of experience as an artist and gallery owner and interviewing artists and crafts people, makers and bakers.

Finally

it’s all in one place, a course that speaks a language

that creatives like YOU understand.

I’m not going to waste your time or mine on the stuff you can find in a “how-to” business book. This is first hand advise on the stuff YOU need about how to make a living from your craft

because the myth of the starving artist is a bunch of baloney.

I’ve taken a lifetime of wisdom and experience in the business of handmade art and put it all together in a comprehensive course. You’ll get worksheets and references and hear advice and real life examples of fine artists and crafts people who make a living creating and selling their paintings, calligraphy, textiles, candles, bath and body products, jewelry, graphics, photography  and just about every craft you can imagine. Some are even bringing in a six figure income from their art and they’ve offered up their wisdom, experiences and secrets to success on topics about all areas of the handmade art world, online and off. We share what we all learned from our mistakes and what we’d do differently if we knew in the beginning what we know now about starting and profiting from a creative business so that you can do it right the first time.

We’ll cover every aspect of making money selling your creations ONLINE AND OFF, at retail and wholesale to shops, at craft fairs, home parties, in galleries, even how to open your own craft gallery or co-op. We’ll talk about pricing, photographing and writing descriptions for your handmade.

I know we all have different learning styles so you’ll get a mix of PDFs, worksheets and Audio files which you can download and listen to at your own pace.

 

 Get the Full Course for $47.

Are you getting your work in front of the RIGHT buyers for your crafts this season?

Are you counting strictly on Etsy, Artfire or other online platforms to sell your crafts for the holiday season? If so, you are missing a huge chunk of the market and a ton of revenue.  Here’s why:

There are a lot of web-savvy buyers who just don’t like to shop online. Even those of us who do purchase manufactured products, books or music  online, want to see and touch art in real-life. For many shoppers, meeting the craftsperson face-to-face is part of the attraction of buying hand made pieces.

It’s mid October and definitely time to be getting your work out there for early holiday shoppers. So, how can you get your work in front of the people who value made-by-hand? If you shy away from the large seasonal craft fairs like Harvest Festival, I don’t blame you. The booth fees are hefty and the whole experience is exhausting. Many artists who previously exhibited at the big festivals report more sales and a better bottom line when they exhibit at smaller venues such as school, church or community craft fairs. If there aren’t any small festivals in your area, you can approach schools, churches or clubs and offer to set up an exhibit of your work and give a percentage to the organization. (Think of it in place of a booth fee.)

House parties are another good way to sell your work. Ask friends, relatives or co-workers to host a party where you can display your work for their friends. Maybe partner with a caterer who is willing to make appetizers just for exposure to new clients.

Retirement homes are often happy to let you set up a display at no charge. It gives their residents an activity and chance to do their shopping independently. Look for upscale independent living communities, not nursing homes. Many of these residents have good disposable income, are educated in the arts and thrilled to have unique gift options without having to depend on anyone to take them shopping.

Corporations and hospitals are open to people setting up a lunch time or after work sale for their employees. It cuts down on personal days or “sick days” which are commonly used as shopping days around the holidays.

Ask gallery owners or boutique retailers to host a trunk show of your work for a percentage of the sales. Particularly if you make jewelry or smaller gift items, it benefits them as well. Galleries sell fewer large pieces of artwork before the holidays so this is a way for them to offer something to their clients that they may not show the rest of the year. If it ‘s a success and your pieces sell well for them, they may agree to carry your work year round.

For more creative ideas on how to turn your craft into cash, see

 “21 Ways to Turn Your Craft into a Cash Cow”

 

Can you really make money 24 hours a day and still get 8 hours of sleep?

Do sleezy internet marketing and get-rich-quick schemes have you wondering if anyone really makes money in their  sleep? Can you run a business from a place of integrity, sell quality products or services, stay in lne with your own deeply held values and still make more money?

When you started out on the self-employment journey, the ultimate dream was to be able to fill your calendar with paying clients or have orders for as many products as you could make, right?

Something happens, though, when you hit that level of success and you realize that even though your clients or customers love what you do and are happy to pay you for it, you can only produce so many products by hand or provide so many hours of service. Does that mean you either raise your prices or you’re stuck at an earnings plateau?

You know you could make a lot more money and serve more people if only you could clone yourself. Well, that hasn’t quite been perfected yet but you know what? If you use some creative problem solving, you really can make more money and still get plenty of sleep.

Whether your business is a product or service, you can expand your reach Continue reading

Easy Ways to Make an Extra $1200 a Month Making Stuff

 

Are you an artist, crafts person, maker or baker?
Think you can’t make money with your art? Not so:
New Tele-class:  “12 Easy  Ways to turn your Creative Hobby into an Extra $1200 a Month”. (and if you do all 12 things, your creative hobby could be a $14,000 a month biz. )
If you put just one of these easy tips into action, you can bring in an extra $1200. a month. If you do ALL these things, that’s 14,400 a  month or 172,800 a year. I don’t believe in “get-rich-quick” so I’m not saying it’s not hard work. If you implement all these ideas, you’ll have to quit your job because you won’t have time for it but guess what? You won’t need it so who cares?

Green your Giving: Ideas for Earth Conscious Wrapping

My sister-in-saw Nancy was a resourceful recycler long before being green was vogue. Raising four children in the 70‘s on a very limited income, she creatively reused and repurposed everything. When other kids were ferociously ripping wrapping paper and balling it up for the trash, Nancy’s’ gang carefully cut the scotch tape and folded the gift wrap for re-giving. Ribbons and bows were saved in a box for next year. The kids learned not to be disappointed if a box from Radio shack contained hand-crocheted slippers. (The box had probably once contained a remote-control airplane before.) It wasn’t unusual to open a Christmas card from Nancy that we’d sent her a previous year. She’d cut the fronts off all the cards she received and paste them to construction paper to create a new card.  Coffee cans and jelly jars were saved all year, decoupaged and repurposed for cookie giving. She’d put a coat of glossy Modge podge on stale Christmas cookies and use them as tree ornaments. She wasn’t trying to save the environment. She was just using what she had to make the holidays special but we could all take lessons from Nancy in being green.
When I attend a holiday gathering that involves gift-giving,  I’m often appalled at the heaps of gift wrap, cardboard boxes, ribbon and other disposable waste. Most people don’t realize that shiny gift wrap is not recyclable because it contains dyes that are difficult to process. Think of the pile on your own living room floor and imagine that multiplied by all of the homes in your neighborhood, let alone the world. I remember a statistic I read a few years ago that Americans generate 25% more waste between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. That’s about 1 million extra tons of trash each year.
It seems that this is the one time of year when even many who are eco-conscious ignore the environmental impact of their gift giving in favor of festivity and flair.
There’s a lot of focus on purchasing gifts that are recycled or recyclable,  but how can you present those gifts and decorate your home or business in a way that’s less wasteful?
I’m guessing if you’re reading this,  you buy from crafters and local indie businesses, and you probably make a lot of your gifts by hand, right?
Here are some simple suggestions for lower-waste giving that’s still merry and bright.
  1. Make your wrapping part of the present. Wrap a hand painted silk or knitted scarf around the gift. Tie a piece of scrap yarn around it instead of purchasing ribbon or make your bows out of something you would normally throw away like the shiny foil bags coffee comes in.
  2. Out-of-date road atlas pages or used road maps make fun colorful wrapping as do pages from the past years calendars, particularly if they have images or quotes.
  3. A lot of parents wrap every tiny stocking stuffer separately but that’s a lot of waste and the kids just want to get to the toy. Consider bundling all the gifts for one child together in a single wrap or if you want to make the opening last longer,  make it game like an Easter Egg Hunt with clues.
  4. Kids love cereal boxes. They make a fun container for books and games.
  5. Use real popcorn to cushion your breakables for shipping.
  6. You know those burlap or canvas wine bags that the grocery stores send home? Why not splash a little fabric paint on them to bring beverages to a party rather than purchase a paper wine bag?
  7. Make or buy reusable cloth market bags out of cool fabric and wrap your gifts in them.  If you are not in the habit of bringing your own bags to the grocer, paint or stamp the brown craft paper bags and use them for gift wrap. (Trader Joe’s makes this extra-easy by using festive holiday-themed brown bags.)
  8. If you still get a physical newspaper delivered to your house, save the comic section.  It makes fun gift wrap.
  9. If you’re hosting a company or family gathering, make creative wrapping part of the fun. See who can be the most resourceful. If guests do use commercial wrapping, take a lesson from Nancy and save to reuse. It might even be fun to see who gets whose paper next year.
What other tips do you have about being a conscious giver? As always, you’re invited and encouraged to share your creative ideas in the comments below.

Lessons about Choosing your Craft Fairs Carefully

Today guest blogger, Gillian Lancaster shares the criteria she used to select a craft fair to participate in and what she learned from a flop. 

We drove through the early morning darkness reflecting that after all our strategizing and demographic research we had a strong chance of good sales. Not only was the fair only for handcrafted items, but it was curated so there would be a variety of handcrafts represented. The organizer assured us it would be well advertised, and told us that historically it was very well attended. We were impressed to find Boy Scouts on hand who speedily carried our boxes inside. This was much appreciated given that it was raining hard and the box lids quickly developed puddles as they were sitting on the sidewalk.

The spaces in the hall had been carefully marked out in 8′ x 6′ rectangles, but it seemed that an extra row of tables had been added. This meant there was very little space for walking along the aisles, so there was a lot of polite shuffling to get through the limited free space! With the assistance of piles of paper towels, coffee and donuts we were soon dry, warm, and had our booth set up and our aprons on – ready for the doors to open.

The table next to us was a cookie fundraiser for the church Youth Group. This seemed like great way for people to see us, but unfortunately the line to buy cookies ran right in front of our booth for much of the morning. The people in line were busy chatting and not only unaware of our booth, but inadvertently blocking other people from getting to us. We slowly realized that although we saw this as a craft fair, for most attendees it was simply a church gathering.

Since traffic to our booth was light we took turns to walk around and chat with other crafters. A lot of people sold at craft fairs most weekends – and many of their stalls were very complex and covered two to three tables. Most vendors had come alone, but there were several husband and wife teams – plus our mother/daughter combo to round things out!

There was a wide variety of sewn items, soaps, cards, Christmas decorations and jewelry. We contributed baby and children’s dresses, journals, notebooks, gift boxes, Christmas cards and packaging supplies. The range of prices were quite broad, and we wondered how crafters with very low prices managed to cover the cost of their supplies. Our items fell in the middle of the price range but we were disappointed to have only two sales all day. Few vendors near us did any better, and several blamed the economy in this part of Pennsylvania. Some said they traveled to go to fairs out of the area.

Many vendors were playing with their phones, reading, chatting, or crafting halfheartedly. With two of us at the booth, we always tried to have one person ready to engage with people who stopped to look at our table. Unfortunately with so little traffic it was easy to get engrossed in other tasks.

There was one vendor who repeatedly yelled over the music to get shoppers to go over to her booth. This didn’t seem to be part of the generally accepted code of etiquette of craft fair behavior, but the organizer had vanished at 8:45 and no one else seemed eager to confront her.

When the end of the day finally came, everyone quickly finished packing up and hurried out the door – like school children released at the end of a long day of lessons! Sadly the Boy scouts were now no where to be seen, and so a rather unGodly crush of vehicles developed as people tried to get close to the door to get their boxes stowed away for a rapid escape!

On reflection we realized today was primarily a learning experience. We had actively sought a craft fair that was only for handmade items and curated to have a wide range of crafts, and we found that. Although the organizer told us the event was widely advertised, the turn out was weak, so we clearly need to ask more about where a fair is being advertised, to be sure that people who like to buy handcrafts are being targeted. Regretfully, since this is the third low income fair we’ve attended in this area, from now on will seek out fairs located in more affluent areas.

DSC02478     Next weekend’s event is a Boutique Crafts Fair – in a more affluent area. Hopefully we will do much   better there!

Listen in  HERE as Gillian and her daughter Caroline share their journey to create a handcrafted  livelihood.

See their gorgeous creations HERE. 

Can you really make money hanging out with your girlfriends and making crafts?

Yesterday my client and friend Maya told me she wants to spend more time making things and wants to spend time with women her age doing something other than talking about their kids. Because she recently left her job, she also needs to bring in some cash in the next couple of months. My job was to come up with a way for her to accomplish all three without her having to get another job.
I suggested she gather her girlfriends and between now and Christmas have several “make and take” parties. Here’s the attraction: Most people have to come up with some holiday gift ideas. Even if their own families don’t celebrate with gift giving, they give tokens of appreciation to their child’s teacher, mailman, hairdresser or petsitter. Everyone appreciates a handcrafted gift more than a mass produced store-bought item. This is an opportunity to cross a few items off their shopping list while having a good time with friends.

Maya has a lot of simple craft project ideas that don’t require artistic skill. Not everyone knits or sews but who can’t handle sequins and a glue gun? She was concerned about the idea of making money from friends. This is a common concern for many newbie entrepreneurs and a topic for a whole other article but I reminded her that none of us think of it that way when we’re invited to a friend’s Pampered Chef party. I recommended she purchase the materials wholesale, add enough markup to price the supplies at retail and add an instructor fee. So for example, if the materials cost her $10., she would charge $25 for the class. To keep with the party atmosphere, she could either supply refreshments or ask everyone to bring either an appetizer or a bottle of wine.

She could also offer pre-made kits so that attendees could purchase supplies to make more of these same crafts at home.

When we got down to the nitty-gritty of how to structure the events, I suggested she Continue reading

The biggest problem successful scanners face

The biggest problem successful scanners face isn’t deciding which idea to pursue. If you’re a “successful” scanner, you’ve realized you can combine many of your interests and passions to create a portfolio career. You probably have a number of profit centers but how do you answer that dreaded question, “what do you do”?

You can either avoid social gatherings and talking to seat mates on airplanes or you’re going to have to come up with a way to describe your livelihood.  If you say, “oh, I do a lot of things” and then start telling them that you are a professional pet photographer, you plan mystery-themed parties and fundraising events, you play harp at weddings and you facilitate end of life ceremonies, you just might be perceived as a bit of a dilettante.

That thing we are all told is so necessary for networking, developing an elevator speech, is great if you can fit what you do into the template, “I (teach, show, help) ( artists, entrepreneurs, animals, children) to ( get more clients, find their passion, take good photographs, etc.). But if you’re like many successful scanners, you can’t  describe your entire portfolio of profit in the time it takes to ride from the lobby to the 5th floor.

So, how is a successful scanner to answer without sounding like you are struggling to make a living by “doing lots of things”? How can you briefly explain that you enjoy a number of different income producing activities?

I like to think of my business as a “medley” of services and products that educate, encourage and inspire creative entrepreneurship. I sometimes refer to it as a “success soup” or “portfolio of profit”.

Rather than say, “uh, I do a bunch of different things”  which is so vague it leaves people thinking you don’t want them to know what you really do or going into a long description of all the different products and services you offer before you know if they’re really interested or just making small talk, why not create an intriguing title? Use words like potpourri, blend, fusion, collage. You want to convey that your multiple profit centers are a deliberate and delightful fusion of your passions not a default because you can’t find a job. When you describe what you do, create a sense of wonder that makes them curious.

After all, isn’t the purpose of that silly elevator speech to get the person to say, “tell me more”?
How do you describe your portfolio of profit?

Yes, you can turn your hobby into a profitable business

This past weekend I attended the university graduation of a young friend. I was happy for her and her parents that the 4 years were completed with honors and no debt but I was so disappointed with the graduation speeches. The faculty talked about careers and jobs but there wasn’t one mention of innovation, curiosity or creativity. As I watched these young people cross the stage and accept their diplomas, I thought of all my friends and clients with advanced degrees who/ve spent decades in jobs that didn’t fit because they’d invested the time and money and didn’t know what else to do. Many eventually contacted me or another career consultant with a desperate plea for help. I hope these twenty somethings will take the time to try out several different options before jumping into a job in their major or worse, whatever job they can get.

Yesterday, I was helping a client with web copy for her career coaching business and I started thinking about all the innovative, unconventional ways people have created thriving, profitable businesses from their hobbies and passions and I want to share a few of these with you. The stories below are proof-positive that you can make a living doing just about anything if you put the focus, energy and love into it. .

Nineteen-year-old Tommy Dement bought and restored his first rare Corvette forty years ago. Today he and his brother Donny are not only still driving classic Corvettes, they’re making money doing it. They’ve restored and sold hundreds through their Murfressboro, Tennessee
business, Dement Vintage Vettes http://www.vintagevettes.net

When Kate Rothacker moved from Ca to Pa she brought her scrapbooking hobby to her new town and started a scrapbooking BnB for girls’ getaway weekends with lots of pampering and cropping plus all the scrapbooking materials and supplies. Cozy Crop House also holds mom-and-child overnights for slumber/scrapbook parties. She opened a second location http://www.cozycrophouse.com and is considering franchising.

Holly Bartman made ten superhero capes for her son’s birthday party and is now running a multi-million dollar business selling custom superhero capes to Old Navy and other companies.

Are you drawn to help others? Chances are, someone steered you to a career in social work or counseling but what if that doesn’t feel like a fit for you? Ketra Oberlander turned her desire to make a difference and her own vision disability into Art of Possibility Studios, an art brand agency that represents handicapped artists.

Here are few more inspiring stories about Turning Hobbies into Million Dollar Business” 

 

Is your business hiding in a (virtual) back alley?

Chatting with artists and crafts people at a large juried show recently,  I heard the same complaint repeatedly. Many of the exhibiting artists said they would love to sell more  but they found it difficult to get their work seen by qualified buyers both on and offline. . They almost all had a website or a page on Etsy, Artfire or another handmade site. The problem was, in a sea of hundreds of thousands of artists with listings on these sites, they weren’t getting noticed or seeing enough traffic to make significant sales.

This complaint is not unique to the craft industry. Many new entrepreneurs seem to have the idea that all they have to do is put up a website (or list their wares on Ebay or Esty)  and people will find them and buy their products. Then the surprise comes when they’ve spent money and time to launch the page and no one finds it.

Would you lease a retail space down a back alley accessible only by another back alley that no one uses unless directed by someone on the main street?  And set up a gallery there to show your best work? Of course you wouldn’t. But that’s what you’re doing if you put up a webpage and sit around waiting for sales to happen. No one can buy from you if they don’t even know you’re there.

So, how do you get the merchants on the main street to recommend you and direct your ideal customer back to your gallery? That’s how you have to think about getting the buyers to your site or page.

Ask yourself these questions:

  • Who is my ideal customer and where are they hanging out?
  • What shops (or sites or forums) do they already spend time in?
  • How can I reach them and get them back to see my work?
  • Is there a way to get the main street “shop-keepers” to direct my ideal customer to my shop (site or page)?

One of the most valuable lessons I learned in the advertising world 35 years ago is that whatever business you are in, you are really in the business of marketing your business. Unless you are already generating enough revenue to hire a marketing team, you don’t have the luxury of spending all day every day making your art. A good chunk of your time in the beginning has to be allocated to getting your work in front of the person who will pay you for it. And the most efficient way to do that is to identify and align yourself with those who already have the attention of your ideal customer.

So, how do you do that? Here are a few tips to get you started:

What kinds of items are complimentary to what you make? For example, if you sell handmade bridal jewelry what other types of businesses would your ideal customer be patronizing? Likely someone selling handcrafted invitations,  veils or headpieces, custom bridal shoes, caterers, photographers, wedding planners, make-up artists, florists, bands and DJs, etc. You might contact them and work out a mutually beneficial set up where you may do a guest post on their blog site with a link back to your site or an arrangement to feature each other’s products and services on your sites. Another free and easy way to get your name in front of those who will buy your product is to find these complimentary businesses on Twitter or Facebook and follow or “friend” them, build a relationship and then once you get to know each other, you can recommend the other’s businesses and link to their sites.

Consider organizing local, complimentary businesses as above for a  trunk show and everyone can send invitations their own list. This means that you each have access to get your products or services in front of the combined clients of the vendors involved. This will benefit each of you and can be a fun, profitable event.

Be creative in the way you think about what business are complimentary to your own. And don’t overlook some that are not necessarily in the same industry. For example, still using the bridal jewelry example, a great resource would be the sales manager at venues such as hotel banquet rooms. Often the first thing a bride does is visit locations to hold the wedding so the sales and catering manager will have access to  brides and their families before they’ve even begun the planning process.

What kinds of businesses are complimentary to yours? Who can you align yourself with to help you get customers to know you are out there?  If you’re ready to take your craft from hobby to making a living, check out the “Beyond Etsy” e-course, HERE 

Beyond Etsy

You’ve probably read books on how to start a business and even some on creating a business selling your art or handmade crafts. There are even some courses out there on starting a crafts business but most are from the perspective of someone who has sold their craft online OR at craft shows OR sold wholesale. None give you first hand advice and stories from artists and crafts people who have experienced ALL areas of the hand made world.

I keep hearing from readers that they want to make a living selling their handmade art and they’ve read books and even sought advise from SBA advisors but that they are more confused than ever because they don’t understand the MBA speak. Creative entrepreneurs think differently and need advise from someone who speaks and understands their language.

I’ve been listening to your questions and challenges, making notes from my decades of experience as an artist and gallery owner and interviewing artists and crafts people, makers and bakers.

Finally, it’s all in one place, a course that speaks a language that creatives like you understand.

I’m not going to waste your time or mine on the stuff you can find in a “how-to” business book. This is first hand advise on the stuff YOU need about how to make a living from your craft because the myth of the starving artist is a bunch of baloney.

 I’ve taken a lifetime of wisdom and experience in the business of handmade art and put it all together in a comprehensive course. You’ll get worksheets and references and hear advice and real life examples of fine artists and crafts people who make a living creating and selling their paintings, calligraphy, textiles, candles, bath and body products, jewelry, graphics, photography  and just about every craft you can imagine. Some are even bringing in a six figure income from their art and they’ve offered up their wisdom, experiences and secrets to success on topics about all areas of the handmade art world, online and off. We share what we all learned from our mistakes and what we’d do differently if we knew in the beginning what we know now about starting and profiting from a creative business so that you can do it right the first time.

We’ll cover every aspect of making money selling your creations ONLINE AND OFF, at retail and wholesale to shops, at craft fairs, home parties, in galleries, even how to open your own craft gallery or co-op. We’ll talk about pricing, photographing and writing descriptions for your handmade.

I know we all have different learning styles so you’ll get a mix of PDFs, worksheets and Audio files which you can download and listen to at your own pace.

You can add an hour of personal one-to-one consulting with me for a total of $197. My usual single session consult fee is $189.

 

 Get the Full Course for $97.

OR The E-Course PLUS Consulting for $197

Choose One